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  • Run Toward the Fire: My journey through mental illness

     Suicide has been a part of my Air Force journey. It took a conversation with someone I trust and respect greatly, who also happens to be a mental health professional, to realize that suicide came nearer to defining my own story than I’d been willing to admit.“I’m going to give you one piece of advice,” he said.“Run toward the fire.”I had been
  • Stress Management

    Most people can say 2020 was a stressful year. From COVID-19 to personal stressors most people’s day-to-day life has changed and they've been forced to accept the “new-norm”. Listed below are classes, courses and other resources available that can help Gunfighters and their families adjust to today's challenges.
  • Mental health providers, leadership partner for deployment resiliency, readiness

    Deployed mental health providers work closely with leadership to help maintain warfighter resiliency and readiness. Service members are away from their usual support systems during deployment, and because the environment and stress puts them in unusual situations, they require innovative and flexible forms of mental health care.
  • Deploying mental health care downrange

    Deployed mental health providers play a vital role in delivering medical care downrange, ensuring the health of the warfighter and the mission. Even though service members who deploy are medically ready, both physically and mentally, the rigors of deployment can take a toll.
  • Be there, be aware: Help prevent suicide

    When we focus on our health, it’s easy to pay attention to physical health versus mental well-being. Ignoring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression can lead to worsening symptoms and more serious issues. For some people, these issues may include an increased risk of suicide.
  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment. The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well helps Airmen focus on the mission.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
  • A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness

    As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
  • Good mental health critical to readiness

    Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
  • Suicide prevention month: stopping suicide is everyone’s battle

    September is Suicide Prevention Month, a time for Americans to build awareness and help understand suicide in our culture. More than 40,000 Americans lose their life due to suicide each year and research shows that rates in the military and the general population are very close. The loss of anyone to suicide is a tragedy, and that is why the Air Force is committed to the goal of zero suicides.
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