Stay Current on the Latest Gunfighter News!

Myths and facts about the vax — debunking common COVID-19 vaccine myths

  • Published
  • Air Force Surgeon General Congressional and Public Affairs

The COVID-19 vaccine has been mandated across the Department of Defense and despite its demonstrated effectiveness and safety, a host of myths have left some Airmen and Guardians hesitant to receive it. While social media posts and some news outlets may make it harder to keep up with what is fact or fiction, the science is clear … approved COVID-19 vaccines work.

Here is a breakdown of the most common myths surrounding COVID-19 vaccines, and the facts behind each myth:

Myth: COMIRNATY is not the same as the PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 vaccine.

Truth: It is common for vaccine names to change after receiving full Food and Drug Administration approval for branding purposes. COMIRNATY and Pfizer-BioNTech are biologically and chemically the same vaccine. The FDA approved Pfizer-BioNTech for licensing and branding as COMIRNATY August 23 for people 16 years and older. Critically, the Emergency Use Authorization for Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine continues and covers the 12-15 year old population.

In accordance with FDA guidance, COMIRNATY has the same formulation and can be used interchangeably with the FDA-authorized Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Providers can use doses distributed under the EUA, to administer the vaccination series as if the doses were the licensed vaccine.

Myth: There were no people of color involved or represented in the research or development of the vaccine.

Truth: COVID-19 has taken a heavy and disproportionate toll on people of color, particularly Black adults. Historically, people of color have been underrepresented in clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for development of COVID-19 vaccines has been particularly important. Diversity within clinical trials for a COVID-19 vaccine also ensures safety and effectiveness across populations. Findings show that Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine safety and efficacy were similar for people of color and white participants.

The FDA offered nonbinding recommendations that strongly encouraged the enrollment of populations most affected by COVID-19, specifically racial and ethnic minorities. Both Pfizer and Moderna worked to ensure that people of color were included in their trials, with Moderna even slowing down enrollment to enroll more racial and ethnic minorities. There have also been efforts on the community side. Historically Black colleges and universities participated in COVID-19 vaccine trials and encouraged participation among their communities. The purposeful encouragement to increase racial and ethnic groups in these trials have achieved greater diversity than many previous trials for other drugs.

Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine can cause problems with breast tissue and lead to breast cancer.

Truth: There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines cause problems with breast tissue or would lead to breast cancer. The mRNA vaccines are processed by your body near the injection site and activate immune system cells that then travel through the lymph system to nearby lymph nodes. In this manner, an individual may experience swelling under the arm where the vaccine was administered due to swelling of the lymph node. The vaccines are not affecting hormone levels, nor are they traveling throughout the body or affecting other body organs, such as breast tissue. Swollen lymph nodes can show up in a mammogram even if women can't feel them. Hence, the Society of Breast Imaging recommends women delay any routine mammography scheduled within four weeks after their most recent COVID-19 vaccination.

Myth: If I take COMIRNATY while breastfeeding, my baby will be infected with COVID-19.

Truth: COVID-19 vaccines cannot cause infection in anyone. Vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19 in people who are breastfeeding. Additionally, breastfeeding people who have received mRNA COVID-19 vaccines have antibodies in their breast milk, which could help protect their babies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine recommend that lactating women receive the vaccine and that breastfeeding should not be stopped around the period of vaccination.

Myth: COVID-19 causes infertility.

Truth: There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines cause fertility problems in women or men. The mRNA vaccines are processed by your body near the injection site and activate immune system cells that then travel through the lymph system to nearby lymph nodes. In this manner, they are not affecting hormone levels, nor are they traveling throughout the body or affecting other body organs.

Myth: The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System proves that COVID-19 vaccination causes too many side effects and deaths.

Truth: VAERS data alone cannot determine if an adverse event was caused by a COVID-19 vaccination. Anyone can report individual events to VAERS, even if it is not clear whether a vaccine caused the problem. These events are studied by vaccine safety experts who track for trends, then validate significant adverse concerns. Recently, the number of deaths reported in VAERS has been misinterpreted and misreported as if this number means deaths were proven to be caused by COVID-19 vaccination.

Myth: COMIRNATY vaccine contains fetal cells.

Truth: None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain fetal cells. Specifically, COMIRNATY and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines did not use a fetal cell line to manufacture their vaccine. However, a fetal cell line was used in early research efficacy of these vaccines.

The use of these fetal cell lines in research and/or production of vaccines and medication is not new. Some over-the-counter medications for which a historic fetal cell line was utilized in research and/or production and manufacturing include: Tylenol, Pepto Bismol, Aspirin, Tums, Senokot, Motrin, Maalox, Ex-Lax, Benadryl, Sudafed, Preparation H, Claritin, and others.

Myth: Researchers rushed the development of the COVID-19 vaccine, so its effectiveness and safety cannot be trusted.

Truth: The COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. have gone through the typical FDA approval process — no steps were skipped — but some steps were conducted on an overlapping schedule to gather data faster.

First, the COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna were created with a method that has been in development for years, so the companies could start the vaccine development process early in the pandemic. Second, vaccine projects received large resources. Governments invested in research and/or paid for vaccines in advance, which enabled a faster approach. Third, some types of COVID-19 vaccines were created using messenger RNA (mRNA), which allows a faster approach than the traditional way that vaccines are made. Fourth, the capabilities of social media reaching numerous people enabled companies to find and engage study volunteers at a faster than typical pace. Finally, COVID-19 is so contagious and widespread, therefore it did not take long to see if the vaccine worked for the study volunteers who were vaccinated.

Myth: If I get the COVID-19 vaccine, it will make me sick with COVID-19.

Truth: You cannot get COVID-19 disease from the COVID-19 vaccine. COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. If you do not have side effects, that does not mean your body’s immune system is not responding.

Myth: COVID-19 vaccines shed or release their components and are harmful.

Truth: Vaccine shedding is the term used to describe the release or discharge of any of the vaccine components in or outside of the body. Vaccine shedding can only occur when a vaccine contains a weakened live version of the virus. None of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contain a live virus.

Myth: COVID-19 vaccine will alter my DNA.

Truth: COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA resides.

Myth: Receiving the COVID-19 vaccine will make me magnetic.

Truth: All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals and will not make anyone magnetic. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain eggs, gelatin, latex, or preservatives.

Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine contains microchips.

Truth: COVID-19 vaccines do not contain manufactured electronic or microchips. Vaccines are developed to fight against disease and are not administered to track your movement. Vaccines work by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies. After getting vaccinated, you develop immunity to that disease, without having to get the disease first.

Airmen, Guardians and family members who still have questions and concerns are encouraged to reach out to their primary care provider. Additional information, including the DoD mandate, can be found here.

Gunfighter Videos

366th Fighter Wing Vice Commander
Command Chief 366th FW
Mountain Home Air Force Base and Idaho Power conducted the first in a series of tests aimed at sending power directly from a hydroelectric dam to the base. If further tests are successful, the dam will provide Mountain Home Air Force Base with continued power even in the event of large-scale power outage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel, Public Affairs Specialist, 366 FW)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing, takes off in front of a C-130J Hercules, assigned to 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen load cargo onto a C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise designed to simulate the 366th Fighter Wing operating as a lead wing from a remote environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing board a C-130J Hercules, assigned to the 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing receive sleeping bags for Exercise Raging Gunfighter from the 366th Logistics Readiness Squadron Individual Protective Equipment (IPE) section at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Combat Command's 366th Civil Engineer Squadron, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, take part in the rapid airfield damage repair event April 19, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from U.S. Air Forces in Europe's 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, take part in the airfield spall repair event April 20, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in the guard shack build event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
The City of Mountain Home Mayor Rich Skyes signed a proclamation on Mountain Home Air Force Base on April 4, 2022. The City of Mountain Home will be observing the Month of the Military Child to show support and appreciation to military children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Krista Reed Choate)
A U.S. Marine Corps pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs off an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 are here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 taxis on the flightline, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to MArine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 lands on the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet with a 25 millimeter gun pod assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 flies into the sky at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. Mountain Home Air Force Base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps quality assurance & power-liners from the Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501, watch an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet taxi on the flight line at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps pilot from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs on to an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 is here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps avionics and power-liners from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 walk across the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. VMFAT-501 is a subordinate unit of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, the aviation combat element of II Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ely Shilaikis, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron consolidated tool kit primary custodian, performs a “180 day” inspection during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The 180 day inspection is a thorough cleaning and examination to ensure serviceability of the tools assigned to a consolidated tool kit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brad Clifton, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron support NCOIC, organizes an e-tool charging station during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. Technical orders are loaded onto e-tools to be utilized for all aircraft maintenance procedures; ensuring aircraft safety and compliance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jake Lenoue, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron avionics technician journeyman, right, works with Senior Airman Jake Fallat, 389th FGS maintenance supply liaison, to locate parts during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The supply liaison is directly integrated with the Squadron to track, source and retrieve parts efficiently for maintenance personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, lifts off for the Nevada Test and Training Range during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 9, 2022. The Nevada Test and Training Range is the U.S. Air Force’s premiere military training area with more than 12,000 square miles of airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, taxi for takeoff as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides several realistic training scenarios that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force crew chiefs from the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, greet F-15E Strike Eagle aircrew assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, before pre-flight inspection as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag is hosted on the Nevada Test and Training Range, which spans more than 12,000 square miles of airspace and 2.9 million acres of land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force maintainers assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, prepare an F-15E Strike Eagle for flight during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag enhances readiness and realistic training necessary to respond to potential challenges across the globe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jeremiah Ables, an assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, signals to an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot to hold their position as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Maj. Christopher “Swat” Hale, left, an F-15E Strike Eagle weapons systems officer and Capt. Anthony “Rook” Mountain, right, an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, complete pre-flight checks for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Pilots practice a variety of offensive and defensive scenarios throughout Red Flag, including air-to-air interdiction, giving them a valuable combat advantage over adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
Mountain Home Air Force Base
The 366th Fighter Wing is in the process of transitioning to a Wing organizational structure that includes groups and an A-Staff, in line with the Combat Air Force, Force Generation (CAFFORGEN) model. This graphic shows the wing structure, once all groups have been reactivated slated for, 23 March 2022. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Airman Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. David Stamps, incoming 366th Operations Group commander at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of groups and assumption of group commanders within the base. The reactivation of groups is also part of the Lead Wing Organization model. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. Eric Phillips, incoming 366th Medical Group commander (MDG) at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of the 366th MDG and assumption of command. The reactivation of groups is also part of Air Combat Command’s standardization of wing structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
Airmen with the 726th Air Control Squadron set up a tent during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
The 726th Air Control Squadron in a convoy to their station to set up for the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
First Lt. Erin Dilorenzo, the convoy and site commander for the Deployed Radar Site during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Antoinette McCall, a medical technician from 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, supports hospital staff at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 16, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Benjamin Eells, a clinical nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, gets fit tested for an N-95 mask while supporting the COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb. 12, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Sarah Cook, a registered nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, comforts a patient while supporting COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb.14, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jaceline Cosby, a registered respiratory therapist from the 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, sets up medical equipment in preparation for a patient’s hospital stay at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 9, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
Members of the Office of Special Investigations speak with Wing Inspectors on how they would inspect a crime scene at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. The Wing Inspectors evaluated the Airmen on how well they performed their role in an active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Dylan Strickland, 366th Healthcare Operations Squadron, paramedic (HCOS) (left) and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Robert Dooley, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter (CES) (right) inspect the condition of a simulated injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise and trains the Airmen in the 366th HCOS and 366th CES on how to aid surviving victims. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) Airmen carefully lowers a simulated injured Airman to a stretcher at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise, it not only trains 366th SFS Airmen to respond to active shooter scenarios quickly, but it also trains them to search and support any surviving victims in the scenario. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Tristin Carey, 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) noncommissioned officer in charge of confinement applies a tourniquet around a leg of a simulated, injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. Airmen from SFS, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron and several other squadrons participated in the active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron Airmen enter a room with simulated casualties at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an Anti-Terrorism Force Protection active shooter exercise which helps Airmen prepare for real life scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
An F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Republic of Singapore Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 425th Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. The 414th Combat Training Squadron conducts Red Flag exercises to provide aircrews the experience of multiple, intensive air combat sorties in the safety of a training environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Royal Saudi Air Force F-15SA, assigned to the Royal Saudi Air Force Weapons School, lands in preparation of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 1, 2022. Participants conduct a variety of scenarios, including defensive counter-air, offensive counter-air suppression of enemy air defenses, and offensive counter air-to-air interdiction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)

 

What to See More Photos? Check Them Out Here!

How to Download Photos:

The best place to download hi-res photos and videos from Mountain Home AFB is the 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs page on the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service.
An account is required to download
any photos and videos!

Another source to download hi-res photos from the Mountain Home PA is the 366th Fighter Wing Flickr Page
No account is needed to download content.

Spacer. Do not delete