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Department of the Air Force releases reports on Racial Disparity Review update, second disparity review

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  • Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs

The Department of the Air Force released a progress update on the Inspector General Independent Racial Disparity Review and a second disparity review report Sept. 9. The progress update report is available for download here and the second report findings can be downloaded here.

PROGRESS UPDATE ON THE FIRST DISPARITY REVIEW

The first Independent Racial Disparity Review, released in December 2020, identified and validated 16 specific disparities for Black/African American Airmen and Guardians. Since that time, stakeholders have been conducting root-cause analysis and have begun implementing corrective measures.

The progress update, compiled by the IG, provides detailed updates on the actions taken by several organizations within the Department of the Air Force to address the disparities identified in the racial disparity review. Some examples include:

Drafted the DAF Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility Strategy
Required an action plan on all Defense Equal Opportunity Climate Survey climate factors relating to Diversity, Inclusion or Equal Opportunity scoring an “improvement needed” (below 49% of favorable responses)
Established Diversity, Equity and Inclusion offices with chief diversity inclusion officers across MAJCOMs
Initiated the Command Justice Climate Tool to track adverse administrative actions with regard to age, rank, gender, and race of those issuing and receiving counseling, admonishments, and reprimands
Revised policy for diverse slates for key military positions
Updated command authority to inspect and remove flags affecting good order and discipline
Added new reporting requirements for Civilian Hiring Panels to govern filling positions at the GS-14 and GS-15 levels

Other changes underway to improve diversity include:

Improving diversity in rated career field accessions as one step toward making a long-term impact on senior leader diversity. The analysis showed wing commander demographics are a lagging indicator for the entire talent management and development system.
Increasing recruiter awareness and appreciation for diversity
Expanding partnerships with minority-serving institutions
Developing and publishing a Diversity and Outreach Recruitment Strategy for senior-level positions.

Among the report’s recommendations is the need for unconscious bias mitigation training for panels, commanders, selection boards, and senior raters. Analysis shows even when all potential root-causes of the disparities are identified and mitigated, there are some outcomes that do not trace directly to an identifiable barrier. In these instances, unintentional and unconscious bias is a possible factor in some outcomes. Therefore evidence-based training is recommended to ensure awareness and help mitigate potential contributing factors.

“The ultimate measure of success is meaningful results,” said Secretary of the Air Force
Frank Kendall. “The IG’s update provides valuable insight into what we’ve accomplished and what remains to be done. A key part of our ‘One Team, One Fight’ mantra is about ensuring our Airmen, Guardians, and Department of the Air Force civilians serve in an inclusive environment where they can achieve their full potential. This is a top priority for me and leaders across the Air and Space Forces.” 

SECOND DISPARITY REVIEW

The second IG disparity review, directed on Feb. 17, focused on gender and ethnicity, to include Hispanics, Latinos, Asians, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders. The second review also referenced and compared data from the prior report on racial disparity involving Black/African American Airmen and Guardians.

The second review is an extension of the DAF’s initial racial disparity review and addressed disparities in discipline, investigation and personnel opportunities for these groups. Anonymous surveys went out to Airmen and Guardians in April. The review included targeted interviews and small-group surveys. Additionally, a comprehensive review of available data from other sources was conducted to develop the review.

“These reviews are important to help us identify and address racial, gender and ethnic disparity issues that negatively affect our Airmen and Guardians,” said Air Force Chief of Staff
Gen. CQ Brown, Jr. “We must continue to listen to our people, understand what they are experiencing, and receive their feedback as we take steps to improve.” 

While the second IG review identified additional disparities within the Air and Space Forces, the root cause analyses for these disparities has only just begun. As the report explains, identification of disparity does not necessarily equate to racial, ethnic or gender bias, racism, or sexism. Root cause analysis is being led by the process owners within the DAF headquarters in the Pentagon and Air Education and Training Command at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, which manages recruiting, accessions, and certain training.

“Diversity and inclusion are fundamental to readiness and mission success,” said Chief of Space Operations Gen. John W. “Jay” Raymond. “We all come from different backgrounds, different cultures, and subscribe to a variety of different beliefs. It is these differences that make us a highly effective force. They underwrite our ability to be agile and innovative, to compete, deter and win. Inclusion is the action that draws the best from every one of our members, providing advantage for our nation as one, ready and successful team.” 

In the second review, IG personnel analyzed existing information, such as military justice data dating back to 2012, and listened to Airmen and Guardians directly. They analyzed individual perspectives from a DAF-wide IG disparity survey that garnered more than 100,000 responses, plus almost 17,000 single-space pages of feedback from service members and civilians. They held 122 group discussions with officer, enlisted and civilian Airmen and Guardians from across all major commands and field commands; and conducted formal interviews with senior leaders and members of DAF Barrier Analysis Working Group teams, such as the Women’s Initiative Team and the Pacific Islander/Asian American Community Team. Finally, the IG team reexamined 21 past studies and reports involving race, ethnicity and gender in the military.

Highlights

Among the groups examined, the second IG disparity review revealed racial, ethnic, and gender disparities, particularly in accessions, retention, opportunities, and to a relatively lesser extent, disciplinary actions. Additionally, based upon survey feedback and group discussions, racially and ethnically diverse and female service members indicated they face barriers and challenges others may not experience.

While the presence of a disparity alone is not evidence of racism, sexism, discrimination or disparate treatment, it presents a concern that requires more in-depth analysis and corrective action. The data identified in this review shows race, ethnicity, and gender are correlating factors, however, they do not indicate causality, and the review does not address why the disparities exist. This report’s primary focus was on identifying areas of disparity for further analysis.

Minorities and females are underrepresented in leadership positions, specifically at the senior leader level. Additionally, females and racial-ethnic minority groups were underrepresented in officer accessions, with the greatest disparity in operations career fields.

Views on disparity varied widely by group. Significantly, about half of all female respondents said maintaining work/life balance and taking care of family commitments adversely impact female Airmen and Guardians more than their male counterparts, while only 18% of male respondents shared this view. Moreover, 70% of female officers responded that these issues impacted females more than their male peers, a view shared by only 29% of male respondents.

One of every three female Airmen and Guardians and one of every four female civilians reported that they had experienced sexual harassment during their careers in the Department of the Air Force.

Anonymous feedback identified firsthand accounts of sexism and sexual harassment in the workplace directed toward females and a negative stigma associated with pregnancy and maternity leave. Additionally, some who experienced these actions reported they did not trust their chain of command to address these inappropriate behaviors and feared reprisal or retribution, or believed nothing would be done.

The review also found Airmen and Guardians of all races and ethnicities expressed concern that discriminatory and racist remarks directed towards their specific group are not appropriately addressed by their chain of command, thus decreasing the internal trust of their unit.

“These disparities and gaps in trust affect our operational readiness — we don’t have time or talent to lose,” said Gina Ortiz Jones, the Under Secretary of the Air Force. “We will actively work to rebuild that trust and ensure Department of the Air Force members, the ‘One Team’ our nation needs to protect our interests in air and space, can serve to their full potential.”

Gunfighter Videos

366th Fighter Wing Vice Commander
Command Chief 366th FW
Mountain Home Air Force Base and Idaho Power conducted the first in a series of tests aimed at sending power directly from a hydroelectric dam to the base. If further tests are successful, the dam will provide Mountain Home Air Force Base with continued power even in the event of large-scale power outage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel, Public Affairs Specialist, 366 FW)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing, takes off in front of a C-130J Hercules, assigned to 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen load cargo onto a C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise designed to simulate the 366th Fighter Wing operating as a lead wing from a remote environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing board a C-130J Hercules, assigned to the 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing receive sleeping bags for Exercise Raging Gunfighter from the 366th Logistics Readiness Squadron Individual Protective Equipment (IPE) section at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Combat Command's 366th Civil Engineer Squadron, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, take part in the rapid airfield damage repair event April 19, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from U.S. Air Forces in Europe's 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, take part in the airfield spall repair event April 20, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in the guard shack build event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
The City of Mountain Home Mayor Rich Skyes signed a proclamation on Mountain Home Air Force Base on April 4, 2022. The City of Mountain Home will be observing the Month of the Military Child to show support and appreciation to military children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Krista Reed Choate)
A U.S. Marine Corps pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs off an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 are here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 taxis on the flightline, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to MArine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 lands on the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet with a 25 millimeter gun pod assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 flies into the sky at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. Mountain Home Air Force Base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps quality assurance & power-liners from the Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501, watch an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet taxi on the flight line at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps pilot from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs on to an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 is here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps avionics and power-liners from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 walk across the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. VMFAT-501 is a subordinate unit of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, the aviation combat element of II Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ely Shilaikis, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron consolidated tool kit primary custodian, performs a “180 day” inspection during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The 180 day inspection is a thorough cleaning and examination to ensure serviceability of the tools assigned to a consolidated tool kit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brad Clifton, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron support NCOIC, organizes an e-tool charging station during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. Technical orders are loaded onto e-tools to be utilized for all aircraft maintenance procedures; ensuring aircraft safety and compliance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jake Lenoue, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron avionics technician journeyman, right, works with Senior Airman Jake Fallat, 389th FGS maintenance supply liaison, to locate parts during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The supply liaison is directly integrated with the Squadron to track, source and retrieve parts efficiently for maintenance personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, lifts off for the Nevada Test and Training Range during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 9, 2022. The Nevada Test and Training Range is the U.S. Air Force’s premiere military training area with more than 12,000 square miles of airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, taxi for takeoff as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides several realistic training scenarios that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force crew chiefs from the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, greet F-15E Strike Eagle aircrew assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, before pre-flight inspection as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag is hosted on the Nevada Test and Training Range, which spans more than 12,000 square miles of airspace and 2.9 million acres of land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force maintainers assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, prepare an F-15E Strike Eagle for flight during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag enhances readiness and realistic training necessary to respond to potential challenges across the globe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jeremiah Ables, an assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, signals to an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot to hold their position as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Maj. Christopher “Swat” Hale, left, an F-15E Strike Eagle weapons systems officer and Capt. Anthony “Rook” Mountain, right, an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, complete pre-flight checks for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Pilots practice a variety of offensive and defensive scenarios throughout Red Flag, including air-to-air interdiction, giving them a valuable combat advantage over adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
Mountain Home Air Force Base
The 366th Fighter Wing is in the process of transitioning to a Wing organizational structure that includes groups and an A-Staff, in line with the Combat Air Force, Force Generation (CAFFORGEN) model. This graphic shows the wing structure, once all groups have been reactivated slated for, 23 March 2022. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Airman Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. David Stamps, incoming 366th Operations Group commander at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of groups and assumption of group commanders within the base. The reactivation of groups is also part of the Lead Wing Organization model. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. Eric Phillips, incoming 366th Medical Group commander (MDG) at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of the 366th MDG and assumption of command. The reactivation of groups is also part of Air Combat Command’s standardization of wing structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
Airmen with the 726th Air Control Squadron set up a tent during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
The 726th Air Control Squadron in a convoy to their station to set up for the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
First Lt. Erin Dilorenzo, the convoy and site commander for the Deployed Radar Site during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Antoinette McCall, a medical technician from 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, supports hospital staff at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 16, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Benjamin Eells, a clinical nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, gets fit tested for an N-95 mask while supporting the COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb. 12, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Sarah Cook, a registered nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, comforts a patient while supporting COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb.14, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jaceline Cosby, a registered respiratory therapist from the 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, sets up medical equipment in preparation for a patient’s hospital stay at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 9, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
Members of the Office of Special Investigations speak with Wing Inspectors on how they would inspect a crime scene at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. The Wing Inspectors evaluated the Airmen on how well they performed their role in an active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Dylan Strickland, 366th Healthcare Operations Squadron, paramedic (HCOS) (left) and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Robert Dooley, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter (CES) (right) inspect the condition of a simulated injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise and trains the Airmen in the 366th HCOS and 366th CES on how to aid surviving victims. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) Airmen carefully lowers a simulated injured Airman to a stretcher at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise, it not only trains 366th SFS Airmen to respond to active shooter scenarios quickly, but it also trains them to search and support any surviving victims in the scenario. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Tristin Carey, 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) noncommissioned officer in charge of confinement applies a tourniquet around a leg of a simulated, injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. Airmen from SFS, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron and several other squadrons participated in the active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron Airmen enter a room with simulated casualties at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an Anti-Terrorism Force Protection active shooter exercise which helps Airmen prepare for real life scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
An F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Republic of Singapore Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 425th Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. The 414th Combat Training Squadron conducts Red Flag exercises to provide aircrews the experience of multiple, intensive air combat sorties in the safety of a training environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Royal Saudi Air Force F-15SA, assigned to the Royal Saudi Air Force Weapons School, lands in preparation of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 1, 2022. Participants conduct a variety of scenarios, including defensive counter-air, offensive counter-air suppression of enemy air defenses, and offensive counter air-to-air interdiction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)

 

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