Stay Current on the Latest Gunfighter News!

Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care and rebuilt infrastructure after Caribbean hurricanes

  • Published
  • By Peter Holstein
  • Air Force Surgeon General Public Affairs
In the wake of the devastation left by Hurricane Irma this September, disaster relief efforts mobilized across the Caribbean as soon as the storm returned to sea. Small teams of Air Force Special Operations medics from the 27th Special Operations Wing were among the first disaster relief teams on the ground, executing a mission for which they are uniquely suited.

Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care
U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Ian Matthews, AFSOC

The scope of destruction was so extreme it was immediately obvious that many islands needed a massive relief and recovery operation, but details were spotty in the days after the storm. Air Force aircraft, logistics support and medics would all be critical to recovery efforts, but these large-scale deployments could not start without a better understanding of the situation on the ground. The 27th SOW medics deployed to help lay the groundwork to bring additional assets to bear for major relief and recovery efforts, as well as to provide initial medical aid to people in need.

Master Sgt. Richard Hogan, Jr. an AFSOC Independent Duty Medical Technician/paramedic was one of the first U.S. service members to deploy after Irma moved out. As Hogan and his unit watched the storms on TV and read daily intelligence reports, they knew chances were good they would be called on to help.

“We were tasked to standby for Harvey, but we didn’t end up going for that. When Irma hit, the orders came down on short notice to deploy,” said Hogan. “We left as soon as Hurricane Irma cleared out of the islands and the flight paths. There were only two of us on the first flight, a flight surgeon, Capt. Ian Matthews, and myself. We didn’t even know which island we’d be going to until we got on the plane.”

AFSOC medics are highly trained medical professionals who also receive tactical training and stay ready to deploy on short notice. They are experts in delivering medical care and coordinating further operations in austere settings with minimal support. This made them the ideal unit to deploy to the Caribbean after Irma destroyed so much of the islands’ infrastructure.

Hogan and Matthews first flew to Puerto Rico on Sept. 10. Upon arrival, Hogan stayed to join the command and control team setting up at San Juan International Airport. Matthews stayed on board the aircraft, continuing to the island of St. Croix.

Hogan’s first job was to get information back to his chain of command so they could share and plan the total effort with relief partners and follow-on forces. Damage on many islands was so severe that communication barely functioned, while airports were completely out of commission. Before additional units could deploy, Hogan’s commanders in the 27th SOW needed more information.

“I helped establish a command and control station in San Juan, called a Joint Special Operations Air Detachment,” recalled Hogan. “One of our missions in AFSOC is to get damaged airfields up and running, so rescue operations can begin. It was such chaos initially, but our training really helped us understand what needed to be done.” 

Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care
U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Marc Villano, AFSOC

Another early job for Hogan was to review the requirements for U.S. State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development relief efforts, and compare it to the situation on the ground. After assessing the hurricane’s destruction, the JSOAD decided to call in another Special Forces Medical Element team from the 27th SOW, consisting of Capt. Phillip Hendly, a Flight Surgeon, and Tech. Sgt. Marc Villano and Staff Sgt. Brian Welling, both IDMTs/paramedics.

“Right away, it was clear that we needed more medical support in those first hours after the storm,” said Hogan. “Within 24 hours, the second team was on station to provide initial medical support and provide casualty evacuations as we went out to other islands.”

As Hogan was helping to establish command and control in San Juan, Matthews was on the ground on St. Croix. Once there, his task was to support missions from that island to St. Maarten and the British Virgin Islands. Devastation there was almost complete, says Matthews, and people were in need of care, evacuation and hope.

“When I got to St. Maarten the first day, a large group of American citizens were gathering outside the airport, waiting for evacuation. Most of them had lost everything, even their homes,” said Matthews. “I went out right away and started screening them for medical issues. I made sure they had medication they needed for any conditions they had and kept them hydrated.”

Matthews, as well as members of the second medical team, also identified people who needed priority evacuations, such as those who were sick, injured or disabled. As other aircraft started showing up, they helped keep the evacuees organized and got them on planes to return to the U.S.

The AFSOC medics were executing the three primary missions of a Special Forces Medical Element – base operational medical support, trauma support and casualty evacuation. They essentially acted as a small medical group in extremely austere locations.

“Our main job was to go in and establish the framework for bigger general purpose forces to come in and provide support,” said Hogan. “We open airfields, provide casualty evacuation in environments not appropriate for general-purpose forces, initial capabilities and needs assessments, and immediate care for victims and our forces.”

Responding to natural disasters like Hurricane Irma serves another purpose for AFSOC medics – they are vital training opportunities. Disaster response lets medics practice skills that are hard to simulate in normal training regimens, and the type of chaos, damage and injuries they need to deal with are all too similar to what they may see on the battlefield.

Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care
U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Marc Villano, AFSOC

“Every time we respond to a natural disaster, we get a new vector to prepare for the next deployment or disaster,” said Hogan. “It gives us experience to shape our future training, new ideas about how to properly equip ourselves in austere and chaotic environments, and it’s a chance for our teams to practice our trauma and surgical skills.”

“It’s an opportunity to go out and help our community and do some good for mankind, but it’s also an opportunity to practice our combat skills and improve our readiness posture,” said Matthews. “We don’t usually get many chances to practice all of our skills in normal training. So we learn a lot from these deployments – we identify weakness and areas to improve.”

The Hurricane Irma relief mission for the 27th SOW medics only lasted about eight days. Their job was to pave the way for other relief efforts, and offer initial care and supplies to people caught in the storm’s wrath. They assisted in evacuating more than 2,000 storm victims and coordinated with eight different federal agencies. However, as the airfields opened and a better understanding of the disaster emerged, there was less need for a special operations mission skill set. This allowed a hand-off to other federal agencies and relief organizations to provide aid.

Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care
U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Ian Matthews, AFSOC

Yet in reflection, it was the people they met and cared for during those first 24 to 48 hours on the ground amid profound devastation that will forever remain with the AFSOC medics.

“It was really moving to hear the gratitude from the Americans we were helping to evacuate,” said Welling. “It’s hard to explain how it felt to go in and use my skills to help all these victims of the hurricane and bring them hope and ensure them that people out there care about them.

“In Special Operations, we live by a mantra of quiet professionalism, but it was really overwhelming to see the emotion on the faces of people we helped. We all got into the medical field to help people, so it’s very rewarding to have that opportunity.”

Gunfighter Videos

366th Fighter Wing Vice Commander
Command Chief 366th FW
Mountain Home Air Force Base and Idaho Power conducted the first in a series of tests aimed at sending power directly from a hydroelectric dam to the base. If further tests are successful, the dam will provide Mountain Home Air Force Base with continued power even in the event of large-scale power outage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel, Public Affairs Specialist, 366 FW)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing, takes off in front of a C-130J Hercules, assigned to 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen load cargo onto a C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise designed to simulate the 366th Fighter Wing operating as a lead wing from a remote environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing board a C-130J Hercules, assigned to the 317th Airlift Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of Exercise Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing receive sleeping bags for Exercise Raging Gunfighter from the 366th Logistics Readiness Squadron Individual Protective Equipment (IPE) section at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, May 17, 2022. Raging Gunfighter is an Air Combat Command (ACC) exercise to prepare the 366th Fighter Wing to operate as a lead wing in a remote environment for future Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandria Byrd)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Combat Command's 366th Civil Engineer Squadron, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, take part in the rapid airfield damage repair event April 19, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from U.S. Air Forces in Europe's 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, take part in the airfield spall repair event April 20, 2022, at the Silver Flag Exercise Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in the guard shack build event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Emily Misfud)
Readiness Challenge VIII participants from Air Force Reserve Command take part in an explosive ordnance disposal event April 18, 2022, at the Silver Flag Training Site, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The Department of the Air Force CE event is hosted by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center. After a 20+ year hiatus, the challenge, a premier event for Department of the Air Force civil engineers, is back. This year's Readiness Challenge is the initial operating capability event before the challenge reaches full operating capability within the next two years. At this year's event, which runs through April 22, eight teams representing major commands and U.S. Space Force are facing off in about 20 events showing myriad of CE capabilities from emergency airfield lighting and water purification to building a guard shack from the ground up and firefighting and EOD operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Debbie Aragon)
The City of Mountain Home Mayor Rich Skyes signed a proclamation on Mountain Home Air Force Base on April 4, 2022. The City of Mountain Home will be observing the Month of the Military Child to show support and appreciation to military children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Krista Reed Choate)
A U.S. Marine Corps pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs off an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 are here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 taxis on the flightline, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet assigned to MArine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 lands on the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
A U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter jet with a 25 millimeter gun pod assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 flies into the sky at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. Mountain Home Air Force Base has a range complex that offers 9,600 square miles of airspace to train. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps quality assurance & power-liners from the Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501, watch an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet taxi on the flight line at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. In the training, the pilots will be able to execute 1000 level Training & Readiness manual progression to attain core skills further preparing them for follow-on orders to F-35B fleet units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps pilot from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 climbs on to an F-35B Lightning II fighter jet at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. The VMFAT-501 is here to conduct deployment for training 1-22, to train student pilots to be proficient in air support and high explosive ordnance drops for their future-fleet F-35B unit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Marine Corps avionics and power-liners from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 walk across the flightline at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 22, 2022. VMFAT-501 is a subordinate unit of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, the aviation combat element of II Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ely Shilaikis, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron consolidated tool kit primary custodian, performs a “180 day” inspection during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The 180 day inspection is a thorough cleaning and examination to ensure serviceability of the tools assigned to a consolidated tool kit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brad Clifton, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron support NCOIC, organizes an e-tool charging station during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. Technical orders are loaded onto e-tools to be utilized for all aircraft maintenance procedures; ensuring aircraft safety and compliance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jake Lenoue, 389th Fighter Generation Squadron avionics technician journeyman, right, works with Senior Airman Jake Fallat, 389th FGS maintenance supply liaison, to locate parts during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 10, 2022. The supply liaison is directly integrated with the Squadron to track, source and retrieve parts efficiently for maintenance personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, lifts off for the Nevada Test and Training Range during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 9, 2022. The Nevada Test and Training Range is the U.S. Air Force’s premiere military training area with more than 12,000 square miles of airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles from the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, taxi for takeoff as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides several realistic training scenarios that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force crew chiefs from the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, greet F-15E Strike Eagle aircrew assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, before pre-flight inspection as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag is hosted on the Nevada Test and Training Range, which spans more than 12,000 square miles of airspace and 2.9 million acres of land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force maintainers assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, prepare an F-15E Strike Eagle for flight during Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 8, 2022. Red Flag enhances readiness and realistic training necessary to respond to potential challenges across the globe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jeremiah Ables, an assistant dedicated crew chief assigned to the 389th Fighter Generation Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, signals to an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot to hold their position as part of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Red Flag provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
U.S. Air Force Maj. Christopher “Swat” Hale, left, an F-15E Strike Eagle weapons systems officer and Capt. Anthony “Rook” Mountain, right, an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, complete pre-flight checks for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 7, 2022. Pilots practice a variety of offensive and defensive scenarios throughout Red Flag, including air-to-air interdiction, giving them a valuable combat advantage over adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin Siegel)
Mountain Home Air Force Base
The 366th Fighter Wing is in the process of transitioning to a Wing organizational structure that includes groups and an A-Staff, in line with the Combat Air Force, Force Generation (CAFFORGEN) model. This graphic shows the wing structure, once all groups have been reactivated slated for, 23 March 2022. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Airman Alexandria Byrd)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. David Stamps, incoming 366th Operations Group commander at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of groups and assumption of group commanders within the base. The reactivation of groups is also part of the Lead Wing Organization model. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Col. Ernesto DiVittorio, 366th Fighter Wing commander, passes the ceremonial guidon to Col. Eric Phillips, incoming 366th Medical Group commander (MDG) at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 11, 2022. This ceremony celebrates the reactivation of the 366th MDG and assumption of command. The reactivation of groups is also part of Air Combat Command’s standardization of wing structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
Airmen with the 726th Air Control Squadron set up a tent during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
The 726th Air Control Squadron in a convoy to their station to set up for the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
First Lt. Erin Dilorenzo, the convoy and site commander for the Deployed Radar Site during the Agile Thunder Exercise 22-1 held Feb. 22-March 4. (Courtesy photo)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Antoinette McCall, a medical technician from 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, supports hospital staff at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 16, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Benjamin Eells, a clinical nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, gets fit tested for an N-95 mask while supporting the COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb. 12, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Sarah Cook, a registered nurse assigned to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, comforts a patient while supporting COVID response operations at University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, Feb.14, 2022. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ashleigh Maxwell)
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jaceline Cosby, a registered respiratory therapist from the 633rd Medical Group, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, sets up medical equipment in preparation for a patient’s hospital stay at St. Francis Medical Center, Monroe, Louisiana, Feb. 9, 2022. The U.S. Air Force medical team, working side-by-side with civilian medical professionals, is deployed in support of continued Department of Defense COVID response operations to help communities in need. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, remains committed to providing flexible Department of Defense support to the whole-of-government COVID response. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Woodlyne Escarne, 14th Public Affairs Detachment)
Members of the Office of Special Investigations speak with Wing Inspectors on how they would inspect a crime scene at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. The Wing Inspectors evaluated the Airmen on how well they performed their role in an active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Dylan Strickland, 366th Healthcare Operations Squadron, paramedic (HCOS) (left) and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Robert Dooley, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter (CES) (right) inspect the condition of a simulated injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise and trains the Airmen in the 366th HCOS and 366th CES on how to aid surviving victims. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) Airmen carefully lowers a simulated injured Airman to a stretcher at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an active shooter exercise, it not only trains 366th SFS Airmen to respond to active shooter scenarios quickly, but it also trains them to search and support any surviving victims in the scenario. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Tristin Carey, 366th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) noncommissioned officer in charge of confinement applies a tourniquet around a leg of a simulated, injured Airman at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. Airmen from SFS, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron and several other squadrons participated in the active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
U.S. Air Force 366th Security Forces Squadron Airmen enter a room with simulated casualties at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Mar. 2, 2022. This scenario is part of an Anti-Terrorism Force Protection active shooter exercise which helps Airmen prepare for real life scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Akeem K. Campbell)
An F-15E Strike Eagle, assigned to the 389th Fighter Squadron at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 provides realistic combat training that saves lives while increasing combat effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Republic of Singapore Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 425th Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, arrives for Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 3, 2022. The 414th Combat Training Squadron conducts Red Flag exercises to provide aircrews the experience of multiple, intensive air combat sorties in the safety of a training environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)
A Royal Saudi Air Force F-15SA, assigned to the Royal Saudi Air Force Weapons School, lands in preparation of Red Flag-Nellis 22-2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 1, 2022. Participants conduct a variety of scenarios, including defensive counter-air, offensive counter-air suppression of enemy air defenses, and offensive counter air-to-air interdiction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William R. Lewis)

 

What to See More Photos? Check Them Out Here!

How to Download Photos:

The best place to download hi-res photos and videos from Mountain Home AFB is the 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs page on the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service.
An account is required to download
any photos and videos!

Another source to download hi-res photos from the Mountain Home PA is the 366th Fighter Wing Flickr Page
No account is needed to download content.

Spacer. Do not delete