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Gunfighters Sign Agreement with Duck Valley Indian Reservation

Col. Jefferson O'Donnell, 366th Fighter Wing commander, and Lindsey Manning, Chairman of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, sign a five-year agreement at the Duck Valley Indian Reservation Oct. 20, 2016. The Duck Valley Indian Reservation, established in 1877, sits within the Mountain Home Air Force Base area of operation, creating a close relationship between base and tribal leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor J. Marth/Released)

Col. Jefferson O'Donnell, 366th Fighter Wing commander, and Lindsey Manning, Chairman of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, sign a five-year agreement at the Duck Valley Indian Reservation Oct. 20, 2016. The Duck Valley Indian Reservation, established in 1877, sits within the Mountain Home Air Force Base area of operation, creating a close relationship between base and tribal leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor J. Marth/Released)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- 366th Fighter Wing leaders visited the Shoshone-Paiute Business Council to sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the next five years at the Duck Valley Indian Reservation Oct. 20, 2016.

This signing signifies a framework for a commitment to work together in the future over the land and airspace which have Shoshone-PaiuteTribes ties. The two will collaborate to promote wise cultural and natural resource stewardship of public lands in the region, to protect the cultural heritage of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and accomplish the military mission of Mountain Home AFB.

“The most important thing is to respect the airbase and airmen,” said Lindsey Manning, Chairman of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. “We want to be the best possible neighbors we can be.”

The Shoshone-Paiute and Bannock Tribes stretch across Idaho, Nevada and Oregon which coincides with Mountain Home AFB's training range and airspace.

“We appreciate all of the support from the tribes,” said Col. Jefferson O’Donnell, 366th Fighter Wing commander. “We have to work together to optimize our training to provide national defense and national security.”

Many areas in Idaho carry a special significance with the Shoshone-Paiute people. Places like the Snake River, Bruneau Canyon and the C.J. Strike Reservoir have a history with the native people who still occupy these regions.

“Our relationship is strong,” said Chairman Manning. “We’ve maintained this strong relationship and plan to build on it in the future.”

Visit the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes website here for more information regarding the tribes' history and culture.

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