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Family Child Care program seeking recruits

Alina Lipatan and Cameron Dunlap build Legos during Family Child Care, March 19, 2014, on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC provides an opportunity for spouses and dependents to become FCC providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

Alina Lipatan and Cameron Dunlap build Legos during Family Child Care, March 19, 2014, on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC provides an opportunity for spouses and dependents to become FCC providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

4-month-old Azriel Lipatan, is cared for by his mother, an Air Force Family Child Care provider, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC currently has a need for providers willing to care for infants and toddlers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

4-month-old Azriel Lipatan, is cared for by his mother, an Air Force Family Child Care provider, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC currently has a need for providers willing to care for infants and toddlers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

4-month-old Azriel Lipatan, is cared for by his mother, an Air Force Family Child Care provider, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC currently has a need for providers willing to care for infants and toddlers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

4-month-old Azriel Lipatan, is cared for by his mother, an Air Force Family Child Care provider, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC currently has a need for providers willing to care for infants and toddlers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

2-year-old Destiny Anthony takes a picture at Family Child Care, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC program offers in-home care for children ages two-weeks to 12 years old, in both on-installation housing and civilian communities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

2-year-old Destiny Anthony takes a picture at Family Child Care, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC program offers in-home care for children ages two-weeks to 12 years old, in both on-installation housing and civilian communities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

3-year-old Cameron Dunlap builds a Lego castle during Family Child Care, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC is an alternative to child development center care for families; the program tailors short term care for unique needs of children and their families in licensed and affiliated FCC homes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

3-year-old Cameron Dunlap builds a Lego castle during Family Child Care, March 19, 2014 on Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Air Force FCC is an alternative to child development center care for families; the program tailors short term care for unique needs of children and their families in licensed and affiliated FCC homes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Caitlin Guinazu/RELEASED)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR BASE, Idaho -- Are you looking for a professional, portable career that will allow you to stay home with your children and work your own schedule?

The Air Force Family Child Care program may be the place for you!

The Air Force FCC program offers in-home care for children ages 2-weeks to 12-year-olds, on installation housing and civilian communities. It provides an opportunity for spouses and dependents to become FCC providers.

The program is an alternative to child development center care for families, it tailors short term care to the unique needs of children and their families in licensed and affiliated FCC homes. "Having ready child care available is a necessity for military members," said Dana Williams, FCC coordinator. "They can successfully perform their military mission, when they have knowledge that their children's safety, health and well-being are protected."

The FCC is currently recruiting FCC providers willing to care for infants and toddlers.

"My favorite part of being a provider is I get a chance to stay home with my daughter," said Victoria McNair, FCC provider. "I get to see children in their crucial growing stages, like walking, eating and potty training."

Mountain Home's FCC currently has families needing assistance with infant care, panama scheduled shifts and extended duty care.

"Family Child Care has a special place in my heart," said Williams. "My husband served in Security Forces for 23-years, working demanding and unusual hours so I could work in the day and not pay for daycare. That's why I stress the importance to spouses with young children so they can have a career allowing them to stay home with their children."

The program provides the training and materials you will need to get started. Training covers a variety of topics to include first aid, health safety, developmental appropriate practices and child guidance. All of the credentials are transferable, allowing you to continue employment wherever the Air Force might send you.

For more information contact the FCC office at (208) 828-6715

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