HomeNewsArticle Display

366th MTF conducts exercise, practices decon skills

Gunfighter children participate in a 366th Medical Treatment Facility exercise, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise gave Gunfighter children the opportunity out of their normal youth center routine to experience a job on base that very few people see. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

Gunfighter children participate in a 366th Medical Treatment Facility exercise, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise gave Gunfighter children the opportunity out of their normal youth center routine to experience a job on base that very few people see. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering Airmen simulate decontaminating a patient, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The 366th Medical Treatment Facility conducted a decontamination exercise to simulate real world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering Airmen simulate decontaminating a patient, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The 366th Medical Treatment Facility conducted a decontamination exercise to simulate real world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering Airmen carry a child to a decontamination tent, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The 366th Medical Treatment Facility conducted a decontamination exercise to simulate real world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering Airmen carry a child to a decontamination tent, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The 366th Medical Treatment Facility conducted a decontamination exercise to simulate real world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Medical Treatment Facility Airmen conduct a decontamination exercise, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise gave Gunfighter children the opportunity out of their normal youth center routine to experience a job on base that very few people see. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

366th Medical Treatment Facility Airmen conduct a decontamination exercise, June 5, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise gave Gunfighter children the opportunity out of their normal youth center routine to experience a job on base that very few people see. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class JaNae Capuno)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho --

The 366th Medical Treatment Facility conducted a decontamination exercise, June 5, 2019.

The exercise simulated a potential real-world mass injury scenario, where 366th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering Airmen practiced a decontamination process with the Youth Center to simulate patients.

"We have to make sure we're fully covered with everything we do," said Senior Airman Jessie Ferrell, 366th Medical Support Squadron medical technician. "A real world situation will never play out the same every time, so we have to prepare to enhance our readiness as medical professionals."

The scenario gave children the opportunity out of their normal youth center routine to experience a job on base that very few people see.

Bio began their process by sending their professionals to the simulated mass injury area to perform a gross-decontamination.

“While the site was being cleaned up, the simulated patients were brought to our facility for decontamination,” Ferrell said. “Afterward, they were sent to the indoor facility to be treated appropriately for specific injuries that were marked on their patient cards.”

The idea behind this brand-new type of exercise brings a more realistic timeline to the MTF.

“Normally we have a heads up about an exercise, so today we thought it was going to be normal training,” said Staff Sgt. Kadeesh McNaught, 366th AMDS NCO in charge of MTF infection, control and sterilization. “For us not knowing what training was going to be today, I think this was the smoothest I’ve seen an exercise go, even if it took a little more time.”

When the training ended, Gunfighter medics came together to discuss the outcome. Leadership highlighted their ability to work as a cohesive squadron as well as several positives in their performance.

“We have a lot of new people, but I didn’t feel like there were just people standing around doing nothing,” McNaught said. “I felt like everybody was looking for something to do and came together as a team.”

News