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Active duty clinic: Helping those who serve

Medication is organized on shelves at the pharmacy, Jan. 25, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Airmen can dispose of their unused medication safely and securely using the Med Safe box located at the Medical Treatment Facility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Hailey Bivens)

Medication is organized on shelves at the pharmacy, Jan. 25, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Airmen can dispose of their unused medication safely and securely using the Med Safe box located at the Medical Treatment Facility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Hailey Bivens)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho --
The 366th Medical Treatment Facility was established 2018 after the 366th Medical Group was deactivated.

Due to the re-organization of the 366th Fighter Wing, the 366th MTF has prioritized its services and facilities to better help Airmen and their families get the care they need.

One of those changes include implementing the active duty clinic which specializes in treatment for those who are on active service status.

“Each provider is assigned to a specific squadron which makes the relationship between PCM team and patient/leadership closer and more Involved,” said Tech. Sgt. Lynette R. Rash, 366th Aerospace Medical Squadron active duty clinic flight chief. “Another good perk about us being more focused is that we get to see what their job entails and what they do on a daily basis.”

The active duty clinic is a unique model across the Air Force; Mountain Home AFB is pioneering the re-organization of the AF medical world by pin-pointing and streamlining military members’ care.

“Since the re-org, the active duty clinic helped me personally by looking into my injuries thoroughly,“ said Master Sgt. Jonathon Krueger, 366th Fighter Wing Inspector General wing exercise planner. “They were able to refer me to a specialist off-base within 30 minutes of my appointment.”

The active duty clinic looks forward to improving its unit to efficiently help Airmen in the future.

“I think this will help Airmen feel that they are cared about,” said Rash. “Not by just the primary care manager team, but also their leadership.”

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