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Gunfighter creates Advanced PTL Course

Mark Tschampl, 366th Aerospace Medical Squadron Health Promotion Coordinator, created an Advanced Physical Training Leader course, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.

The 366th Civil Engineer Squadron performs side lunges during morning physical training, October 2, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Side lunges help work your hamstrings, quadriceps, and addcutor muscles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alaysia Berry)

Mark Tschampl, 366th Aerospace Medical Squadron Health Promotion Coordinator, created an Advanced Physical Training Leader course, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.

The 366th Civil Engineer Squadron performs push-ups during morning physical training, October 2, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Push-ups help build core strength and target multiple muscle groups. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alaysia Berry)

Mark Tschampl, 366th Aerospace Medical Squadron Health Promotion Coordinator, created an Advanced Physical Training Leader course, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.

The 366th Civil Engineer Squadron performs arm stretches during morning physical training, October 2, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Stretching keeps the muscles flexible, strong, and healthy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Alaysia Berry)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- Mark Tschampl, 366th Aerospace Medical Squadron Health Promotion Coordinator, created an Advanced Physical Training Leader course, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.

The Air Force used to spend a lot of time training PTL’s on how to conduct and lead group exercise. However, due to budget cuts the program changed. A PTL is an airman in charge of their unit’s physical training, conducting PT assessments, and making sure their people are fit to fight. PTL training turned into a short, online, computer based training video.

“It doesn’t cover enough,” Tschampl said. “It doesn’t give an individual enough information to teach them how to organize group exercise effectively, so that it’s actually beneficial to those who are trying to get in shape for that PT assessment.”

Recognizing a need to better equip PTL’s with proper training, he spent approximately four months conducting research and creating an in-depth PTL program.

“It’s a two hour, in-person class, and we actually go over fitness fundamentals,” Tschampl said. “We go over how to create a workout for a group, and modify that workout for different fitness levels within that group.”

“We have a big mission, and anybody injured from improper technique is a piece being taken from that,” said Senior Master Sgt. Andre Percell, 366th Fighter Wing Staff superintendent. “Properly trained airmen are more equipped to accomplish our mission.”

Tschampl explained that his office is located in the fitness center, and he’s able to see squadron PT happen as he comes into work. He used to see the problems bad techniques could cause.

After establishing the advanced PTL program he’s noticed a difference.

Tschampl’s overall goal with creating the course is to help improve squadron’s PT test pass rate and to reduce injuries.

“The difficulty is making a workout that’s specifically going to help somebody in an area that they need help in, and to do it in a quick manner without hurting them,” Tschampl said. “It’s really about having the knowledge to create workouts that are going to target specific goals that you might have, in terms of improving fitness without destroying people.”

For more information about the course please contact Mark Tschampl at 208-828-2175 or mark.a.tschampl.civ@mail.mil.

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