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Anyone can speak up: 366th Medical Group observes Patient Safety Awareness Week

Staff Sgts. Heather Ford (left) and Joshua Woods, 366th Medical Operations Squadron aerospace medical technicians, complete a medical training scenario March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Everyone in health care plays a role in safe care of patients from medical technicians to doctors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

Staff Sgts. Heather Ford (left) and Joshua Woods, 366th Medical Operations Squadron aerospace medical technicians, complete a medical training scenario March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Everyone in health care plays a role in safe care of patients from medical technicians to doctors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

Staff Sgt. Lucas Robbins, 366th Medical Group paramedic, inserts an IV into an airman's arm March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Patient safety week was Mar 12-18, and has been a national campaign since 2002. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

Staff Sgt. Lucas Robbins, 366th Medical Group paramedic, inserts an IV into an airman's arm March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Patient safety week was Mar 12-18, and has been a national campaign since 2002. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

Staff Sgt. Joshua Woods, 366th Medical Group aerospace medical technician, demonstrates the correct way to stitch a wound March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Aerospace medical technicians learn their craft at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, during their 98 day technical school. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

Staff Sgt. Joshua Woods, 366th Medical Group aerospace medical technician, demonstrates the correct way to stitch a wound March 16, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Aerospace medical technicians learn their craft at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, during their 98 day technical school. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jeremy D. Wolff/Released)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- The 366th Medical Group observes Patient Safety Awareness Week, March 12-18. This week was a time to recognize and improve the Mountain Home community’s commitment to patient safety and to promote awareness among the base staff, patients, and families.

“Patient safety is an all-encompassing focus so that we eliminate, as close to 100 percent as possible, human error in the treatment of patients,” said Col. Andrew Moore, the 366th Medical Group commander. “From the CEO to the lowest ranking airman, everybody needs to do the right thing for the safety for the patience.”

Everyone in health care plays a role in delivering safe care. From all levels of care providers to the patient’s confirmation of identification and previous medical history –members of the 366th Medical group are dedicated to keeping patients and those who care for them free from harm.


“We have an environment where any one can speak up,” said Col. Moore. “Even if you are the most senior surgeon in the facility, the most junior scrub technician should, and will, respectfully say ‘are we sure this is what we want to do next’ and that way you can avoid errors.”

Patient Safety Awareness week didn’t just help the care providers within the medical group, there was also a role the patient and community held. The medical group needed the patients to be active participants in the safety checklists.


“The patient needs to know what medications they are taking, why the care team is providing labs, why they are doing the procedure,” said Col. Moore. “The patient needs to know the expectation so they, too, can be a loop in the safety chain so we can make sure we are doing it right.”

Through observing Patient Safety Awareness activities and continuing to improve the safety chain in the medical group, care providers and patients can help eliminate the impact and harm done through human error.

“There’s a point when you want to be associated with the best and I know we are the best Air Force in the world,” said Col. Moore. “There’s no reason we can’t be the best medical service in the world.”

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