HomeNewsArticle Display

No air power without ground power: AGE in a nutshell

Senior Airman Kyle Hughes, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the generator of a -60 February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. While most of the equipment AGE airmen work on is meant for flightline operations, their equipment can also support the needs of other agencies on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Senior Airman Kyle Hughes, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the generator of a -60 February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. While most of the equipment AGE airmen work on is meant for flightline operations, their equipment can also support the needs of other agencies on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Staff Sgt. David Winans, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment inspector craftsman, inspects a piece of equipment February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Airmen use technical orders to ensure proper procedures are followed during inspections and routine maintenance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Staff Sgt. David Winans, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment inspector craftsman, inspects a piece of equipment February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Airmen use technical orders to ensure proper procedures are followed during inspections and routine maintenance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Burroughs, Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the tire on a portable heater February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. AGE consists of an inspections side, maintenance and a dispatch side of operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Burroughs, Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the tire on a portable heater February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. AGE consists of an inspections side, maintenance and a dispatch side of operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Staff Sgt. David Winans, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment inspector craftsman, inspects a piece of equipment February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Inspectors go through and ensure technical orders were followed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Staff Sgt. David Winans, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment inspector craftsman, inspects a piece of equipment February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Inspectors go through and ensure technical orders were followed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Senior Airman Kyle Hughes, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the generator of a -60 February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The -60 is a turbine engine that provides bleed air to an air conditioning unit, which in turn pushes air to the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

Senior Airman Kyle Hughes, 366th Aerospace Ground Equipment maintenance, changes the generator of a -60 February 28, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The -60 is a turbine engine that provides bleed air to an air conditioning unit, which in turn pushes air to the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Lott/Released)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- From the flightline to the front gate, Aerospace Ground Equipment has a wide range of responsibilities at the 366th Fighter Wing.

They’re responsible for the upkeep and maintenance on all flightline ground equipment. One such piece of equipment is the -60 engine generator. It’s a turbine engine that provides bleed air to an air conditioning unit, which in turn pushes air to the aircraft.

While most of the equipment AGE airmen work on is meant for flightline operations, their equipment can also support the needs of other agencies on base.

“We also work hand-in-hand with (Communications Squadron) during the summer months,” said Master Sgt. James Jordan, 366th Equipment Maintenance Squadron AGE inspector section chief. “We’ll supply them with conditioned air to cool the server rooms.”

Manned at less than 50% from the recent deployments, the AGE shop works hard at protecting the personal time of the airmen.

“My goal is to get the most out of the airmen, to get them trained the best we can,” said Master Sgt. Cody Langager, 366th EMS AGE flight chief. “But also look out for their off-duty time and making sure they’re not working sporadic and changing days.”

AGE leaderships believes these considerations are what makes sure airmen reach their best potential.

“We’re one team, one fight,” Langager said.

News