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The weather outside is frightful

A 366th Civil Engineer Squadron airman plows snow on the roads at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Feb. 28, 2017. Mountain Home AFB has experienced a record snow fall this season with 35.6 inches of snow. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor Marth/Released)

A 366th Civil Engineer Squadron airman plows snow on the roads at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Feb. 28, 2017. Mountain Home AFB has experienced a record snow fall this season with 35.6 inches of snow. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor Marth/Released)

Snow settles on tree branches after accumulating over night at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Feb. 28, 2017. MHAFB received 35.6 inches of snow this season, making it the largest snowfall in a winter season. According to local weather studies, Mountain Home AFB receives an average of 13.2 inches of snow annually. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chester Mientkiewicz/Released)

Snow settles on tree branches after accumulating over night at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Feb. 28, 2017. MHAFB received 35.6 inches of snow this season, making it the largest snowfall in a winter season. According to local weather studies, Mountain Home AFB receives an average of 13.2 inches of snow annually. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chester Mientkiewicz/Released)

A 366th Civil Engineer Squadron airman sweeps the streets at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Feb. 28, 2017. Mountain Home AFB broke the 1985 snowfall record of 33.4 inches by 2.2 inches thus far. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor Marth/Released)

A 366th Civil Engineer Squadron airman sweeps the streets at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Feb. 28, 2017. Mountain Home AFB broke the 1985 snowfall record of 33.4 inches by 2.2 inches thus far. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Connor Marth/Released)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho --

Mountain Home Air Force Base has seen more snow this winter than ever before.


Approximately 35.6 inches of snow fell this winter and the season continues to shatter previous records.


"We can't believe it," said Mr. David Kinney, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron supervisor of pavements and equipment. "This is way out of the norm. Looking back on the last twenty years nothing comes close to this."


The previous record of 33.4 inches fell in 1985.


"Our job is to exploit the weather for the wing to keep all the equipment and personnel safe," said Capt. Glenn Harrison, 366th Operation Support Squadron weather flight commander.


The Civil Engineer squadron and weather flight work together to ensure safe travels on base.


"We get weather updates from Capt. Harrison," Kinney said. "Those updates give us an idea of what we need to do."


Mountain Home AFB also broke the record for most snow in a month. Mother Nature dropped 20.3 inches of snow in the month of January. The previous record was set in November of 1985 with 18.9 inches of snow.


"Record snow fall calls for record actions," Kinney said.


The 366th CES set a record for the most NAAC (Sodium Formate - Cryotech NAAC (r) Solid Runway Deicer) put down in a winter season with approximately 19 tons on the flightline alone.


NAAC is used for non-airside applications, primarily because it does not contain chlorides that cause corrosion to steel embedded in concrete. Additionally, NAAC is effective at much lower temperatures, (0 degrees Fahrenheit), than sodium chloride and urea, which lose their effect below 20 degrees Fahrenheit.


"These conditions are hard on the drivers," Kinney said. "They put in long shifts and as the winter season continues it wears them down. With that said, they are doing an excellent job with the resources provided."


The good working relationship between the civil engineer squadron and the weather squadron helps airmen with everyday transportation.


"We have a pretty good relationship with the Civil Engineer squadron," Harrison said. "This leads to clear roadways to travel the base safely."


All these winter records are taking airmen to their limits.


"Whenever there's a snow storm we have to have airmen on duty 24 hours a day including weekends, to keep the base informed for Monday morning," Harrison said. "With our minimal manning our team excelled and I'm proud of them."


Based off of historical norms, winter is still several weeks from its chilly snowy end.

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