Mountain Home Air Force Base   Right Corner Banner
Join the Air Force

News > Gunfighters go to Olympics
 
Photos
Previous ImageNext Image
Veterans Olympics
A parade kicks off the 25th Annual Veteran’s Olympics Sept. 15 in Boise, Idaho. The four-hour long event included a parade, games and a barbecue, and was a way for the military and civilian communities to recognize local veterans while showing appreciation for the sacrifices they make. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Roy Lynch)
Download HiRes
Gunfighters go to Olympics

Posted 9/19/2012   Updated 9/24/2012 Email story   Print story

    


by Staff Sgt. Roy Lynch
366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs


9/19/2012 - MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- More than 90 Airmen from MHAFB volunteered during the 25th Annual Veteran's Olympics Sept. 15 in Boise, Idaho.

The four-hour long event included a parade, games and a barbecue, and was a way for the military and civilian communities to recognize local veterans while showing appreciation for the sacrifices they make.

"The Veteran's Olympics continues to reinforce the relationship we have with Southern Idaho and the cities, towns and people across the region," said Chief Master Sgt. John Weimer, 366th Fighter Wing command chief. "It also helps us repay the debt the veterans in Idaho paid for our country."

According to Tom Ressler, Idaho Division of Veteran Services supervisor for the office of veteran advocacy, the olympics were a highlight for the veterans as it allowed them to relive their youth.

They may have just been kicking a soccer ball, but in their minds they were playing an intense football game, said Ressler. "It was a lot of fun and we are glad to be here to provide it for them."

Guest speaker retired Maj. Gen. Darrel Manning, Adjutant General of Idaho National Guard, was also the first keynote speaker 25 years ago and congratulated all the veterans on their service with a quote from Gen. Omar Bradley.

"There is no glory in war; there is only glorious courage of simple human beings who make superhuman sacrifices for others," he quoted.

Airmen offer up their service but can learn from the past with such an event.

"The Mountain Home Airmen get a stronger appreciation for those who served before them," said Weimer. "They get a greater understanding what the sacrifice really means that they make day in and day out because we still deploy to hot spots around the world and do the job our nation depends on us for."



tabComments
No comments yet.  
Add a comment

 Inside MHAFB

ima cornerSearch

tabNewsRSS feed 
SecAF: From legacy of past to uncertain future, bold leadership key

SARC advocates train, prepare , strengthen Gunfighters

Enlisted evaluation and promotion systems implementation timeline

New eligibility cutoff dates for promotion to tech, master

A Call to Honor

Simple steps to prevent viral infections

Sept. 11 - Pulse on AF force management

VMM-161 practices cargo drops

tabFeaturesRSS feed 
Mobility takes Idaho by storm

Never the same, never forgotten

Uncommon gallantry: Remembering Bernard Fisher

Aircraft work together, hone combat edge

tabCommentariesRSS feed 
Remembering 1st living AF Medal of Honor recipient

I signed up for what?  2

Rider, then Coach, always the Safety Advocate  3

We Remember


Site Map      Contact Us     Questions     USA.gov     Security and Privacy notice     E-publishing  
Suicide Prevention    SAPR   IG   EEO   Accessibility/Section 508   No FEAR Act