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366 MDG
Airmen with the 366th Medical Group prepare a room for patient arrival during an Operational Readiness Exercise, Sep. 13, 2012 at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise creates a situation in which Airmen are able to simulate operations they can expect to see in a deployed location. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Roy Lynch)
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MDG participates in exercise

Posted 9/17/2012   Updated 9/17/2012 Email story   Print story

    


by Airman 1st Class Shane M. Phipps
366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs


9/17/2012 - MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- This is part three of a four-part series on missions during an Operational Readiness Exercise here.

While preparing for an upcoming Operational Readiness Inspection, MHAFB is conducted an ORE Sep. 11 through 15.

During the exercise, members of different groups around base, including the 366th Medical Group, simulated their ordinary duties in an unordinary environment - Kunsan, Korea.

"We have a deployment-style medical station set up in a tent, and we are seeing any injured players in the exercise, real-world or simulated," explained Staff Sgt. Omar Hernandez, 366th Medical Group independent duty medical technician.

The exercise created situations in which Airmen were able to simulate operations they can expect to see in a deployed location.

"It's testing us to see how we would be able to operate in a deployed location while taking care of patients, players and any emergencies," said Airman 1st Class Shaquille Ellington, 366th MDG medical technician.

Due to war-efforts continuing overseas, it is more important than ever for personnel to accurately understand the unique duty requirements present while downrange.

"We have to be deployment ready because there will be a point-in-time when what we're practicing here will happen in a real-world situation," said Hernandez.

For the members of the MDG, many situations they face could mean the difference in life or death.

"Everyone's job is important, but our medical training is extremely vital in an environment like this," explained Ellington. "I definitely will be a little more ready to deploy than I was before this ORE."

The medical team's success can be attributed to the positive contributions from the Airmen.
"This is extremely beneficial for us, especially our new Airmen learning these things for the first time," said Hernandez. "We have a great crew and everything has gone well so far."

Maintaining an understanding of why the exercise was important helps the medical Airmen posses a positive disposition.

"It helps to know some of the things I'm practicing right now could potentially save a life downrange," said Ellington. "Some things are tedious, but I know in the big scope of things it's for a very serious reason."



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