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The symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can often be debilitating, significantly affecting a patient’s quality of life. Air Force mental health professionals have successfully treated many Airmen with the use of prolonged exposure therapy. Through this collaborative therapy, the patient is safely and gradually exposed to trauma-related memories and situations that have been avoided. The eventual goal is to alter the patient’s relationship with and reaction to the traumatic event so it no longer affects their quality of life and ability to do their job. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
0 7/03
2018
Capt. Daniel Gibson, 92nd Medical Operation Squadron psychologist, goes over the Nexxus Biotrace with Staff Sgt. Donald Durst, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron aerospace medical technician, May 4, 2018 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. The program allows patients to see how their body is responding to both physical and mental stress. The patient is able to visualize what his or her body is doing under stress and see how it differs when in a relaxed state. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski) A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness
As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
0 5/16
2018
U.S. Air Force Special Operations Surgical Teams practice integrated operations during a Special Tactics exercise, Hurlburt Field, Fla., Oct. 16, 2015. Air Force Medicine is adapting the SOST model for battlefield care, to provide additional support for future combat operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Callaway) Ready today, ready tomorrow - Air Force prepares for the future of medical readiness
The future of warfare is uncertain, and tomorrow’s conflicts may not look like today’s. To prepare for this uncertainty, the Air Force is assessing how it prepares its medical forces to support the warfighter.
0 4/23
2018
Bedrock of readiness: Air Force Medical Home improves access to care and supports Airmen readiness Bedrock of readiness: Air Force Medical Home improves access to care and supports Airmen readiness
Air Force Medical Home is a patient-centered, team-based approach to delivering primary care to patients at Air Force health facilities. As with all aspects of the Air Force Medical Service mission, maintaining Airmen’s medical readiness and optimizing performance is the highest priority. To achieve this mission, the Air Force Medical Service is working to increase its health care capabilities, and provide greater levels of mission support to line commanders.
0 12/04
2017
Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care and rebuilt infrastructure after Caribbean hurricanes Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care and rebuilt infrastructure after Caribbean hurricanes
In the wake of the devastation left by Hurricane Irma this September, disaster relief efforts mobilized across the Caribbean as soon as the storm returned to sea. Small teams of Air Force Special Operations medics from the 27th Special Operations Wing were among the first disaster relief teams on the ground, executing a mission for which they are uniquely suited.
0 11/29
2017
Mental health readiness Good mental health critical to readiness
Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
0 11/20
2017
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