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Mountain Home AFB closes surgical squadron during inactivation ceremony

The 366th Surgical Operations Squadron was officially inactivated during a ceremony Jan. 12, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base.

Col. Camella Nulty relinquishes command of the 366th Surgical Operations Squadron to Col. Steven Ward, 366th Medical Group commander, during an inactivation ceremony Jan. 12, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Airmen previously assigned to the squadron have been relocated to other units within the clinic or assigned to different units across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Armstrong)

During the ceremony, Nulty expressed her pride in the squadron’s decade of service.

Col. Steven Ward, 366th Medical Group commander and Col. Camella Nulty, 366th Surgical Operations Squadron officially retire the squadron’s guidon during an inactivation ceremony Jan. 12, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. During the ceremony, Nulty expressed her pride in the squadron’s decade of service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malissa Armstrong)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- The 366th Surgical Operations Squadron was officially put into inactive status during an inactivation ceremony, Jan. 12, 2018.

The inactivation of the squadron's 24/7 facility was part of the 366th Medical Group's transition to out-patient care.

"We closed the squadron back in August and have since been working behind the scenes to wrap up all the loose ends," said Col. Camella Nulty, 366th SGCS commander. "The inactivation ceremony is a recognition of the squadron closing after 10 years and it allows for in the future a potential reactivation or opening back up if needed."

The squadron was comprised of different sections that included diagnostic imaging, surgical services and in-patient unit.

"If any of our providers needed X-rays or CT scans they'd send patients to our department to get those taken care of and that would help with their diagnostics to help with the treatment of the patient," Nulty said. "We did labor and delivery as well as (gynecology) services, surgery and preventative care for our women's population."

Airmen previously assigned to the squadron have been relocated to other units within the 366th Medical Group or assigned to different units across the Air Force.

"I was blessed with getting this squadron because this was the best assignment I've had thus far," Nulty said. "The team here, the phenomenal care and dedication to our patients, was second to none."